Thakeham Furniture - Antique Furniture Shop, Petworth, West Sussex, UK

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Welcome to our shop, Thakeham Furniture, in Petworth, West Sussex, UK. Established in 1987 by Tim and Belinda Chavasse, we are a small family firm specialising in fine English antique furniture from the Georgian and Victorian periods. We stock a good range of 18th and 19th century antique furniture with an emphasis on originality, good colour and patina. Browse our extensive, user friendly website, known as one of the best antique furniture websites in the UK. Thakeham Furniture are members of LAPADA [The London and Provincial Antique Dealers Association], so you can purchase with confidence, as we follow a strict code of practise

 

THAKEHAM BLOG

Fruitwood: Where was it used and why?

Posted on March 27, 2015 by Belinda Chavasse

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During the 18th and 19th centuries fruitwood was widely used for the construction of vernacular or

“country” furniture in France and England. The most commonly used fruitwood was the timber from the native or wild cherry, Prunus avium, which produced a decent sized trunk and fine, wide planks. The wood is of a close, firm texture and reddish colour, and cabinet makers were drawn to it for various reasons; firstly, availability: a ready supply of locally produced timber. It is also very easy to work: the grain is fine and smooth, light in weight yet stable, and relatively free from knots. It holds a finish well; whether originally oiled or varnished, it acquires a lovely silky sheen over the years.

Another factor was its reddish colour and superficial resemblance to mahogany. At the time mahogany was a very expensive imported timber, only used on4482b the finest “town” pieces; cherry was often used instead, such as in this lovely Provincial armoire, dating from about 1800. It has a mellow, “honey” colour and soft, waxy finish.

Different types of fruitwood are notoriously difficult to distinguish from each other. Pearwood is strong, heavy and fine in grain, tinged with red. It was used from a very early period for simple country furniture. Stained black and polished or varnished, it was also used to imitate ebony as stringing and inlay, and in English 18th century bracket clocks. It is the only fruitwood to display “fiddleback”, the curious crosshatched figuring that was traditionally used on the backs of violins. Apple is pale and hard in texture, sometimes speckled with tiny knots; plum was also occasionally used, a pale cream when fresh, turning to a reddish brown – quite similar to cherry.

 
 
 
 

Tim, Belinda & Harriet Chavasse
Thakeham Furniture Ltd
Golden Square Petworth West Sussex
GU28 0AP 01798 342 333